Resources

Want to learn more about The Council on Recovery and the work we do to make our community a better, addiction-free place? On this page, you can download our publications, go through our financial reports and audits, read about recent research in the area of addiction and recovery, as well as get to learn more about our affiliations and partners.

Healing Choices Brochure

This brochure highlights some of the key points regarding The Council's flagship Intensive Outpatient Treatment program, Healing Choices. Click here to download it and read on!

At The Council on Recovery, we believe that the key ingredient to running a successful organization is maintaining complete transparency in all our dealings. With this in mind, we provide the following list of our most recent financial reports, audits and 990 forms.

The Council on Recovery is dedicated to keeping the Houston area community up to date on all the recent scientific research and development in the area of addiction and recovery.

    • The Council directly served 73,715 individuals across the full spectrum of substance use and related issues, from behavioral health education and prevention programs to treatment and long-term recovery support.
    • 100% of children participating in the Kids Camp at The Council reported increases in their ability to communicate with their families.
    • Over 50,000 people participate in Venue events, meetings, workshops and classes at The Council each year. There are, on average, over forty-eight Twelve Step and recovery support meetings on campus each week.
    • 74% of the clients completing the Intensive or Supportive Outpatient treatment reported a decrease in substance abuse symptoms from admission to completion.
    • 76% of peers involved with Recovery Support Services report an increase in totally recovery capital (strengths) from enrollment to 12-month follow up.
    • Among clients, 97% are more hopeful about the future after participating in a program or service offered by The Council on Recovery
    • 62% of caregivers participating in the Cradles project improve attitude toward children’s power and independence. 90% of pregnant caregivers report abstinence from alcohol and drugs at delivery.
    • 92% of juvenile probationers participating in the Drug Free Youth program increase their knowledge about the harms of substance abuse, and 90% decrease or maintain no use of alcohol.
    • Heavy Drug Use (i.e. cocaine, prescription drugs, ect.) among high school students participating in the Choices prevention program is lower than the national and Houston average.
    • 96% of older adults and their family members know of at least one place to call if they need help with an alcohol or other drug problem after attending a Wellderly presentation.
    • 87% of service providers for older adults indicate that some or all of the information from the Wellderly presentation was new to them.
    • 1 million people ages 12 and older abuse or are dependent upon drugs and alcohol. (Source)
    • 6 million adults and 500,000 teens meet criteria for gambling addiction. (Source: The National Council on Problem Gambling)
    • Alcohol poisoning (a result of binge drinking) kills more than 2,200 Americans a year, but 70% of them weren’t identified as alcoholics. (Source: CDC)
    • By 2020, mental and substance use disorders will surpass all physical diseases as a major cause of disability worldwide. (Source: SAMHSA)
    • 6% of people living on the street report chronic substance abuse. (Source: National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc.)
    • In 2013, an estimated 22.7 million Americans aged 12 and older needed treatment for a drug or alcohol problem. (Source: SAMHSA)
    • 31% of jail inmates had grown up with a parent or guardian who abused alcohol or drugs. (U.S. Department of Justice, 2007) (Source)
    • According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) National Survey on Drug Use and Health,1 5 million persons aged 12 or older needed treatment for an illicit drug or alcohol abuse problem in 2009 (9.3 percent of persons aged 12 or older). Of these, only 2.6 million—11.2 percent of those who needed treatment—received it at a specialty facility. (Source)
    • A third of the 1.2 million Americans with HIV currently use drugs or binge on alcohol.  Contrary to popular belief, it is not the sharing of contaminated injection equipment that primarily links drug use to the HIV epidemic. Rather, drug as well as alcohol use can impair judgment and lead to risky sexual behavior and HIV transmission.  This is why substance abuse treatment can play an important role in preventing the spread of HIV. (Source)
    • Approximately 1 in 11 people who use marijuana get addicted. (Source)
    • Prescription painkillers act on the same site in the brain as heroin and can be addictive. (Source: SAMHSA)
    • 54% of prescription drugs that are used for non-medical purposes are obtained for free from a friend or relative. (Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse)
    • Prescription drug deaths have quadrupled between 1999-2011 in the U.S. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
    • 1 in 15 people who take non-medical prescription pain relievers will try heroin within 10 years. (Source: National Survey on Drug Use and Health 2004-2010)
    • Over 16% of weekend, nighttime drivers tested positive for illegal, prescription, or over-the-counter drugs. More than 11% tested positive for illicit drugs. (Source: NHTSA)
    • Depressants, opioids and antidepressants are responsible for more overdose deaths than cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine and amphetamines combined. (Source: Foundation for a Drug-Free World)
    • One NHTSA study found that in 2009, 18 percent of fatally injured drivers tested positive for at least one illicit, prescription, or over-the-counter drug (an increase from 13 percent in 2005). (Source)
    • In 2010, toxicity due to synthetic marijuana resulted in 11,400 cases of emergency room visits. (Source: SAMHSA)
    • According to Quest Diagnostics, the positivity rate for 7.6 million urine drug tests in the combined U.S. workforce increased to 3.7 percent in 2013, compared to 3.5 percent in 2012. This was the first time the percentage has increased since 2003. (Source)
    • In a study of seriously injured drivers admitted to a Level 1 shock trauma center, more than a quarter of all drivers tested positive for marijuana. Research conducted at the University of Auckland, New Zealand found that habitual marijuana users were 9.5 times more likely to be involved in crashes, with 5.6 percent of people who had crashed having taken the drug, compared to 0.5 percent of the control group. (Source)
    • For the United States in 2009, 63% of fatally injured drivers were tested for the presence of drugs, which is equivalent to 3,952 fatally, injured drivers. Narcotics and cannabinoids accounted for almost half of all positive results. (Source)
    • 21% of the general US population smokes cigarettes. (Source)
    • Nearly 1 in 5 Americans smoke cigarettes. (Source)
    • About 1 in every 5 U.S. deaths are related to cigarette smoking. (Source)
    • Tobacco use causes more deaths than AIDS, crack, heroin, cocaine, alcohol, car accidents, fire, suicide, and murder—combined. (Source)
    • Smoking is directly responsible for approximately 90% of lung cancer deaths and approximately 80-90% of COPD (emphysema and chronic bronchitis) deaths. (Source)
    • Smokeless tobacco is harder to quit than cigarettes. Holding an average-size dip in your mouth for 30 minutes gives you as much nicotine as smoking three cigarettes. (Source)
    • Cigarette smoke contains over 7,000 chemicals, 70 of which are known cancer-causing agents. Ingredients include cyanide, mercury, lead, arsenic, ammonia, and formaldehyde. (Source)
    • The direct medical costs of smoking add up to more than $130 billion per year, along with $150 billion a year in productivity losses from premature deaths. (Source)
    • 3% of all cigarettes smoked in the United States are by individuals with substance abuse disorders or mental illness. (Source)
    • Up to 80% of individuals with substance abuse and mental illness are smokers. (Source)
    • Substance addicted and mentally ill populations have higher rates of tobacco- related illnesses and death than the general population. (Source)
    • 75% of people ages 12 and older who received substance abuse treatment at a specialty facility in the past year reported smoking cigarettes in the past month, compared with 24% of the general population.
    • Including smoking cessation interventions in substance abuse treatment is associated with a 25% increase in the likelihood of maintaining long-term alcohol and drug abstinence. (Source – link broken)
    • In 2009, 19.5% of high school students were current smokers. (Source)
    • In 2009, over 5% of middle school students were current smokers. (Source)
    • Concentrations of many cancer-causing and toxic chemicals are higher in secondhand smoke than in the smoke inhaled by smokers. Nonsmokers exposed to secondhand smoke at home or work increase their risk of developing lung cancer by 20-30%. According to the Surgeon General, there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke. (Source)
    • 50% of adults have a family member with alcoholism. (Source)
    • 6 million people, or one in every 12 adults, suffer from alcohol abuse or dependence along with several million more who engage in risky, binge drinking patterns that could lead to alcohol problems. (Source)
    • Approximately 1 in 5 men and 1 in 12 women develop alcohol dependence in their lifetimes. (Source)
    • Alcoholism is the 3rd leading lifestyle-related cause of death in the nation. (Source)
    • There are approximately 88,000 deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use each year in the United States. (Source)
    • The 9.6% of adult alcoholics drink 25% of the alcohol that is consumed by all adult drinkers. (Source)
    • Alcohol withdrawal can kill you after long term use of alcohol. (Source)
    • More than 4 in 10 teens who begin drinking before age 15 eventually become alcoholics. (Source)
    • Approximately 1 in 5 men and 1 in 12 women develop alcohol dependence in their lifetimes. (Source: WHO)
    • Alcohol contributes to over 200 diseases and injury-related health conditions, most notably alcohol dependence, liver cirrhosis, cancers, and injuries. (Source: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism)
    • A U.S. Department of Justice study found that as many as 40% of violent crimes occur under the influence of alcohol. (Source: Foundation for a Drug-Free World)
    • In the past month, 1 in 4 U.S. adults engaged in binge drinking. (Source: SAMHSA)
    • 728 people will be injured or killed each day between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day in drunk driving accidents, a rate 2-3 times higher than the rest of the year. (Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention)
    • In 2012, 3.3 million deaths, or 5.9% of all global deaths, were attributable to alcohol consumption. (Source: WHO)
    • Almost 28% of Americans with alcohol dependence also have a major depressive disorder (such as clinical depression). (Source: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism)
    • There are approximately 88,000 deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use each year in the United States. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
    • On average, it takes 2-3 hours for 1 drink to leave the body. (Source: SAMHSA)
    • Alcohol-related traffic deaths in the US were 12,998 in 2007. This is more than three times as many American soldiers who died in combat in the first six years of the Iraq war. (Source)
    • One in 10 deaths among working age adults ages 20-64 is due to excessive alcohol use. (Source)
    • In 2000, about 16% of all Texas adults had a problem with alcohol and 5 percent had a problem with drugs. (Source)
    • Nearly nine of every 100,000 Texans died from prescription drug overdoses in 2012, most caused by abuse of illegally obtained prescription medications. (Source – link broken)
    • The Drug Policy Alliance reports a 150 percent increase in accidental overdoses over an eight-year period in Texas. (Source – link broken)
    • 1 out of 6 of Texas teens reports having misused or abused a prescription drug in the past year. (Source – link broken)
    • According to recent data, Texans pay about $7.5 billion each year to cover health-care costs related to tobacco use—or about $750 per household every year. (Source)
    • 4,300 nonsmokers die each year in Texas from exposure to secondhand smoke. (Source)
    • Among 12 to 17 year olds in Texas, the average age of first marijuana use is 13.7 years old while the average age of first cigarette use was 13.1 years old. (Source)
    • In 2008, 12 percent of all Texas secondary students said that when they drank, they usually drank five or more beers at one time, and 13 percent reported binge drinking of liquor. (Source)
    • Alcohol is the primary drug of abuse in Texas. In 2008, 63 percent of Texas secondary school students (grades 7–12) had ever used alcohol, and 30 percent had drunk alcohol in the last month. (Source)
    • In 2000, the total economic costs of illegal drug abuse in Texas were estimated at $9.5 billion. (source)
    • In 2008, there were 1,005 people killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes in Texas where a driver was under the influence of alcohol. This is 28.9% of the total number of people killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes. (Source: NHTSA)
    • During 2008 in Texas, more DUI – Alcohol crashes were reported in the hour between 2:00am and 2:59am than any other hour of the day. Also, more alcohol related crashes occurred on Saturday than any other day of the week. (Source: NHTSA)
    • According to the CDC, during the years of 2006-2010 the average number of years of potential life lost due to excessive alcohol use in Texas was 199,618. Nationwide, the figure was 2,560,290. (Source)
    • Every year in Texas an average of 6,514 people die as a result of excessive alcohol use. 372 of those deaths are children under 21 years of age. (Source)
    • Among persons in Texas enrolled in substance use treatment in a single-day count in 2012: 43.9% were in treatment for a drug problem only 13.0% were in treatment for an alcohol problem only 43.1% were in treatment for problems with both drugs and alcohol. (Source)
    • A review of data associated with fatal crashes in Harris County reveals that a higher percentage of young drivers are involved in fatal crashes than other parts of Texas and the nation (74% in Harris County versus 69% nationally). (Source)
    • Texas DSHS reported 1,677 deaths in Harris County related to alcohol in 2002. (Source)
    • The NHTSA ranked Harris County first in per-capita alcohol-related deaths among 10 of the nation’s most populous counties in 2006 based on 232 alcohol-related traffic deaths and 203 traffic deaths in which a driver was legally drunk. (Source)
    • 3% of DUI fatalities in Region 6 (13 counties comprising the greater Houston area) in 2012 involved youth under age 21 (TXDoT). (Source)
    • 7% of survey respondents ages 12 and older in the Houston area reported taking prescription pain killers that were not prescribed for them. 17.4% of Houston high school students reported taking prescription drugs without a prescription. (Source)
    • 2% of students in Houston and 26.4% of students in Texas reported being offered or sold drugs on school grounds. (Source)
    • 4,785 minors were arrested for drug and alcohol offenses in the greater Houston area in 2012. 25% were for alcohol law violations, DUI, and public intoxication. (Source)
    • Among current college students specifically:
      1. More than 4 in 10 (44 percent) say they abuse Rx stimulants in order to study and improve academic performance, while 31 percent say they abuse in order to stay awak
      2. More than 1 in 5 (21 percent) report abusing Rx stimulants in order to improve work performance at their job
      3. More than a quarter of students (27 percent) who report abuse of Rx stimulants also hold full-time jobs, in addition to attending school (compared to 12 percent of those who do not abuse Rx stimulants) (Source)
    • 1 out of 6 of Texas teens reports having misused or abused a prescription drug in the past year. (Source – link broken)
    • 4 million adolescents have an alcohol or drug problem.  (NSDUH) (Source)
    • More than 4 in 10 teens who begin drinking before age 15 eventually become alcoholics. (Source)
    • Each year, approximately 5,000 youth under the age of 21 die as a result of underage drinking. (Source)
    • In a 2011 survey, approximately 8% of kids ages 12 to 17 reported past-month marijuana use. (Source)
    • 1 in 4 teens has misused or abused a prescription drug at least once in their lifetime. (Source)
    • Half of all lifetime cases of mental and substance use disorders begin by age 14 and three-fourths by age 24. (Source)
    • Each year, approximately 5,000 youth under the age of 21 die as a result of alcohol-related car crashes, homicides, suicides, alcohol poisoning, and other injuries such as falls, burns, and drowning. (Source)
    • 4 million adolescents have an alcohol or drug problem. (Source)
    • In 2009, 19.5% of high school students were current smokers. (Source)
    • Among 12 to 17 year olds in Texas, the average age of first marijuana use is 13.7 years old while the average age of first cigarette use was 13.1 years old. (Source)
    • In a recent survey, more than 2 million kids ages 12 to 17 reported past-month marijuana use. (Source: Office of National Drug Control Policy)
    • Parents who talk to their teens regularly about drugs are 42% less likely to use drugs than those who don’t, yet only 25% of teens report having these conversations. (Source: Red Ribbon Campaign / National Family Partnership)
    • Youths who perceive that their parents would “strongly disapprove” of their use of illicit substances are much less likely to use those substances than youths who perceive that their parents would “somewhat disapprove, or neither approve or disapprove.” (Source: SAMHSA)
    • Four million children and adolescents in this country suffer from a serious mental disorder that causes significant functional impairments at home, at school, and with peers. (Source: National Alliance on Mental Illness)
    • 50% of all lifetime cases of mental and substance abuse disorders begin by age 14 and 75% by age 24. (Source: SAMHSA)
    • Teens who abuse prescription drugs are: 2 times more likely to use alcohol, 5 times more likely to use marijuana, and 12-20 times more likely to use illegal street drugs such as heroin, Ecstasy and cocaine than teens who do not abuse prescription drugs. (Source: Foundation for a Drug-Free World)
    • Alcohol is the primary drug of abuse in Texas. In 2008, 63 percent of Texas secondary school students (grades 7–12) had ever used alcohol, and 30 percent had drunk alcohol in the last month. (Source)
    • In 2008, 12 percent of all Texas secondary students said that when they drank, they usually drank five or more beers at one time, and 13 percent reported binge drinking of liquor. (Source)
    • In Texas, tobacco use among high school students has increased. Prevalence of tobacco use according to a 2006 study was 32%, an increase from 26% in 2001. (Source)
    • 3% of DUI fatalities in Region 6 (13 counties comprising the greater Houston area) in 2012 involved youth under age 21 (TXDoT). (Source)
    • 3% of DUI fatalities in Region 6 (13 counties comprising the greater Houston area) in 2012 involved youth under age 21 (TXDoT). (Source)
    • 7% of survey respondents ages 12 and older in the Houston area reported taking prescription pain killers that were not prescribed for them. 17.4% of Houston high school students reported taking prescription drugs without a prescription. (Source)
    • 2% of students in Houston and 26.4% of students in Texas reported being offered or sold drugs on school grounds. (Source)
    • 4,785 minors were arrested for drug and alcohol offenses in the greater Houston area in 2012. 25% were for alcohol law violations, DUI, and public intoxication. (Source)
    • In 2014, 9.0% of 8th graders surveyed had consumed alcohol in the past 30 days. The percentage climbed to 37.4% for 12th (Source)
    • Every year in Texas an average of 6,514 people die as a result of excessive alcohol use. 372 of those deaths are children under 21 years of age. (Source)
    • A study confirms that young adults generally misuse and abuse prescription stimulants for functional reasons:
      1. Half of all young adults surveyed (50 percent) report abusing Rx stimulants to study or improve academic performance
      2. More than 4 in 10 (41 percent) say they misuse or abuse them to stay awake
      3. Almost one-fourth (24 percent) misuse or abuse Rx stimulants to improve work performance at a job
    • Approximately 1 in 4 children under 18 live in a family with alcoholism, and many more live in a family with drug addiction.  (NSDUH) (Source)
    • More than 7 million children live in a household where at least one parent is dependent on or has abused alcohol. (Source)
    • Approximately 1 in 4 children under 18 live in a family with alcoholism, and many more live in a family with drug addiction. (Source)
    • In a 2011 survey, approximately 8% of kids ages 12 to 17 reported past-month marijuana use. (Source)
    • Each year, approximately 5,000 youth under the age of 21 die as a result of alcohol-related car crashes, homicides, suicides, alcohol poisoning, and other injuries such as falls, burns, and drowning. (Source)
    • In 2009, over 5% of middle school students were current smokers. (Source)
    • More than 10% of U.S. children live with a parent with an alcohol problem. (Source: SAMHSA)
    • Children who sampled alcohol by or before sixth grade were five times more likely than their non-sipping schoolmates to finish off a full adult beverage while in ninth grade — and four times more apt to have binged or been drunk. (Source)
    • In the United States, 13% of women knowingly drink alcohol while pregnant, putting their children at risk of being born with a Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). (Source: Minnesota Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome)
    • Just over 20 percent (or 1 in 5) children, either currently or at some point during their life, have had a seriously debilitating mental disorder. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
    • Four million children and adolescents in this country suffer from a serious mental disorder that causes significant functional impairments at home, at school, and with peers. (Source: National Alliance on Mental Illness)
    • An estimated 40,000 babies are born with a Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder each year making these diseases more common than new diagnoses of Autism Spectrum Disorder. (Source: SAMHSA)
    • Every hour, one baby is born suffering from opioid withdrawal. (Source)
    • Smoking is directly responsible for approximately 90% of lung cancer deaths and approximately 80-90% of COPD (emphysema and chronic bronchitis) deaths. (Source)
    • Tobacco use causes more deaths than AIDS, crack, heroin, cocaine, alcohol, car accidents, fire, suicide, and murder—combined. (Source)
    • Cigarette smoke contains over 7,000 chemicals, 70 of which are known cancer-causing agents. Ingredients include cyanide, mercury, lead, arsenic, ammonia, and formaldehyde. (Source)
    • 4,300 nonsmokers die each year in Texas from exposure to secondhand smoke. (Source)
    • Alcohol contributes to over 200 diseases and injury-related health conditions, most notably alcohol dependence, liver cirrhosis, cancers, and injuries. (Source: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism)
    • A third of the 1.2 million Americans with HIV currently use drugs or binge on alcohol.  Contrary to popular belief, it is not the sharing of contaminated injection equipment that primarily links drug use to the HIV epidemic. Rather, drug as well as alcohol use can impair judgment and lead to risky sexual behavior and HIV transmission.  This is why substance abuse treatment can play an important role in preventing the spread of HIV. (Source)
    • Studies have shown that binge drinking contributes to delaying wound healing, increasing blood loss and makes patients more susceptible to infection. (Source)
    • The report finds that 3.9 percent of the nation’s adult population aged 18 or older had serious thoughts about suicide in the past year, but that the rate among adult illicit drug users was 9.4 percent. (Source – link broken)
    • Roughly 50% of individuals with severe mental disorders are affected by substance abuse. (Source – link broken)
    • 3% of all cigarettes smoked in the United States are by individuals with substance abuse disorders or mental illness. (Source)
    • Up to 80% of individuals with substance abuse and mental illness are smokers. (Source)
    • Substance addicted and mentally ill populations have higher rates of tobacco- related illnesses and death than the general population. (Source)
    • Half of all lifetime cases of mental and substance use disorders begin by age 14 and three-fourths by age 24. (Source)
    • By 2020, mental and substance use disorders will surpass all physical diseases as a major cause of disability worldwide. (Source: SAMHSA)
    • 6% of adults aged 18 or older received mental health treatment or counseling during the past 12 months. (Source: SAMHSA)
    • An estimated 1 in 5 Americans 18 and older will experience mental health problems in any given year. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
    • Almost 28% of Americans with alcohol dependence also have a major depressive disorder (such as clinical depression). (Source: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism)
    • Approximately 4% of the nation’s adult population (ages 18 or older) had serious thoughts about suicide in the past year, and that rate among adult illicit drug users was 9.4%. (Source: SAMHSA)
    • Approximately 8.9 million adults have co-occurring disorders meaning they have both a mental and substance use disorder. (Source: SAMHSA)
    • Of the 9 million adults who have co-occurring disorders (both a mental and substance abuse disorder), only 7% of individuals receive treatment for both conditions. 56% receive no treatment at all. (Source: SAMHSA)
    • The annual total estimated societal cost of substance abuse in the United States is $510.8 billion. (Source)
    • The direct medical costs of smoking add up to more than $130 billion per year, along with $150 billion a year in productivity losses from premature deaths. (Source)
    • According to recent data, Texans pay about $7.5 billion each year to cover health-care costs related to tobacco use—or about $750 per household every year. (Source)
    • The estimated cost of drug abuse to society exceeds $190 billion: $130 billion in lost productivity, $20 billion in healthcare costs, and $40 billion in legal costs including efforts to stem the flow of drugs. (Source: National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc.)
    • A U.S. Department of Justice study found that as many as 40% of violent crimes occur under the influence of alcohol. (Source: Foundation for a Drug-Free World)
    • 728 people will be injured or killed each day between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day in drunk driving accidents, a rate 2-3 times higher than the rest of the year. (Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention)
    • There are approximately 88,000 deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use each year in the United States. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
    • Every man, woman, and child in America pays nearly $1,000 annually to cover the expense of unnecessary health care, extra law enforcement, auto accidents, crime, and lost productivity resulting from substance abuse. In 2000, total economic costs of illegal drug abuse in Texas were estimated at $9.5 billion. (Source)
    • Alcohol-related traffic deaths in the US were 12,998 in 2007. This is more than three times as many American soldiers who died in combat in the first six years of the Iraq war. (Source)
    • According to the CDC, during the years of 2006-2010 the average number of years of potential life lost due to excessive alcohol use in Texas was 199,618. Nationwide, the figure was 2,560,290. (Source)

Organizations & Affiliations | Local, State & National Resources

Through our innovative holistic treatment methods and unique strategy of treating the mind and body, The Council continues to raise the standard of addiction care in our field. Our dedication to excellence has been recognized and supported by major organizations and affiliations. Our vital efforts are strongly informed a wide range of local, state, and national resources.

United Way Agency

Our programs and services are carefully reviewed by the United Way in order to ensure we are providing the highest quality programs that make a significant impact on key community issues. Moreover, United Way supervises our governance policies to guarantee the appropriate stewardship and protection of donor investment.

National Council for Behavioral Health

The Council on Recovery is a member of the National Council for Behavioral Health. This organization is the unifying voice of America’s community mental health and addictions treatment organizations. Together with 2,800 member organizations, it serves more than 10 million adults and children living with mental illnesses and addictions. The organization is committed to ensuring all Americans have access to comprehensive, high-quality care that affords every opportunity for recovery and full participation in community life.

Local Resources: 

State Resources:

National Resources: